11
Sep
by Micah Watson

If you’re the Spotifying type, my new EP ‘Little Foxes’ is there for your enjoyment. And thanks in advance for the $.0000007!

10
Apr

Here’s a new song from the upcoming release.

It’s unmixed and unmastered - but you’ll still get the idea.

Enjoy!

18
Oct

The band performs ‘It Is Well’ from the album Glorious Unveiling live at First Hattiesburg, MS

18
Sep

It’s few months old, but here’s ‘Gloria’ live from First Hattiesburg in Hattiesburg, MS. 

12
Sep

Chilly Gonzales On Song Writing

I listen to NPR - don’t judge. 

I recently heard an interview with pianist Chilly Gonzales. I’ll admit that I had never heard of him before this interview, but I had heard his music (and so have you if you’ve ever seen an iPad commercial). The whole interview is worth a listen, but there are a couple things that he said in the interview that really jumped out at me as a songwriter:

- - - - - -

SULLIVAN: My guest is pianist Chilly Gonzales. His latest album is called “Solo Piano II.” I’m wondering when you sit down to write these pieces, are you just sort of working it out in the moment, or are you writing it down on paper and playing it over and over and over again and, you know, having each song be completely independent of each other?

GONZALES: It’s more the second version, except I do not write it down. I mostly wait for the songs that won’t leave me alone to just be persistent enough that I’ll finish them.

SULLIVAN: Is it hard to remember what you’ve just written?

GONZALES: Well, if it’s hard to remember, I guess it wasn’t good.

SULLIVAN: Is that true?

GONZALES: Yeah. You just make music all the time, and the stuff that won’t let you alone is the good stuff. That’s the stuff that people are going to connect to, because it won’t leave you alone. You’re humming it all the time when you’re in the airplane. You know, every time you sit down at the piano, your fingers end up on that same A-flat minor chord. And you - at one point, you realize you have a song.

- - - - - -

"If it’s hard to remember, I guess it wasn’t good."

My songwriting process is pretty similar to his. I let songs roll around in my head for days and days and I go back to the guitar and piano to work them out. I’d love to hear your songwriting process.

05
Sep

Everything is a Remix Part 1 from Kirby Ferguson on Vimeo.

Love this. Thanks to Shaun Groves for showing me this. Makes the music nerd in me very happy. 

01
Sep

Suggestions For Using Youth Sings Part 2

Youth Sings

Suggestions For Using Youth Sings

A few weeks ago I started a series of blog posts based on a book that I found called “Youth Sings”. It’s an old Youth Group song book that includes a page of suggestions on leading worship for youth groups. Even though it’s an old book, I think the advice is pretty timeless - especially when placed in the right context. 

Today, we’ll look at point #2:

2. Plan the singing and choice of numbers in advance, but keep an informal atmospere by having occasional request numbers.

The last blog I wrote stressed the importance of preparation and I don’t think that point can be over emphasized. I talked about how it’s considerate to the person operating your lyrics and it will greatly help you as you lead your congregation. This week though, let’s talk about how preparation will improve your ability to lead your worship team and in turn your whole congregation. 

I’ve had the opportunity to be in several positions on stage. I’ve been the leader and I’ve also been a background vocalist and instrumentalist. This blog post could be entirely driven by personality and preference - so keep that in mind - but whatever position I’m in on stage I feel like a prepared leader, who has the songs mapped out and has a clear direction, adds so much to the worship experience for everyone. 

As a worship leader - I want to be respectful of my worship team’s time and talent. So, it’s very important for me to know what songs we are going to be rehearsing, the structure and key of the songs, and how the songs will fit together. I want to get the songs to my worship team in a timely manner so they can practice them on their own and I will do my best to make sure the charts and mp3’s of the songs match the structure and key that we will be playing them. When my team arrives for rehearsal - I will do everything within my power to make sure the rehearsal space is ready to go for my musicians to plug right in. For the majority of churches - your worship team will be made up of volunteer musicians. They have jobs, famillies, hobbies, friends, and responsibilities outside of the church. So I want to show them that their time is valuable to me. The best way to do that is preparation. 

As a volunteer musician I would say much of the same. I want to be respectful of my fellow musician’s time and abilities. I always want to go through the songs on my own to make sure I’ve learned my parts, the songs structure, and so I’m able to engage with my fellow musicians without being tied down to a chart. 

So where does “keeping an informal atmosphere by having occasional request numbers” come in? 

As a leader, I think it comes with holding loosely to being the ultimate authority on song selection and structure. I would recommend keeping open lines of communication with your worship team members on what songs they are listening to and songs that may fit well in your congregational setting. Also, creating an atmosphere in worship rehearsals that allows your team members to say things like “I really felt like we should have gone into that chorus again right there” or “do you feel like we should all hold back on that verse.” By doing this, you’ll also begin to see more leaders develop within your team. 

As a worship team member - it means making a song your own (within your talent level). I would encourage you to learn a song well enough that you can freely worship and follow where you’re being lead. Know your strengths and weaknesses as a musician. If you can’t pull off that sweet guitar riff that’s on the recording - that’s okay. Create something that falls within your skill level or just play the chords really really well. 

I don’t want to get ahead of myself though, because point #3 will be “learn the numbers well.” Being prepared has to be the foundation that we build everything else on. 

13
Aug
I was at a church recently when I came across this book. It’s called ”Youth Sings” (published in 1951) - and I really loved the “suggestions for using youth sings” that I found on the back page (no sarcasm). A lot of times, we overthink things as worship leaders, and I think this may bring some of us (myself included) back to the basics. I’m going to break down the list over the next few weeks - but I’d love to hear your thoughts too.
Let’s look at point #1
1. We may not use song books anymore - that’s been replaced by propresenter, media shout, easy worship, and the dreaded powerpoint. But if you’re the worship leader - part of your job is to make sure the lyrics are available to your congregation in a format that is easy to read and is without distraction. How many times have you been in a worship gathering and the lyrics have been slow to come up on the screen or they’ve had spelling or grammatical mistakes? Everyone always spins around to give the person operating the computer a nasty look - but ultimately it’s our responsibility.
That responsibility begins with thinking through how I’ll arrange the songs: will I repeat a chorus multiple times? Will I repeat the bridge at the end? How will I transition between songs? After I have these things mapped out - I always take a few minutes to go through the presentation software to make sure the lyrics match the plan. I know we all want to leave room for a spontaneous change in the songs structure - but the Holy Spirit can just as easily tell me when I’m going through the worship set on Thursday that I need to sing the chorus of ‘Mighty To Save’ twice as He can on Sunday morning at 11:15am. I’m not diminishing spontanaety in worship - but if the rest of the song is mapped out, a quick change will be an easy fix for whoever is running my lyrics because I’ve already taken the time to get everything else in order. Not to mention - it’s serving my lyrics operator and ultimately the church when I am prepared.
Some other things to consider with lyrics: make sure that the stanzas, choruses, etc are arranged in a way that makes sense on each slide. Make sure the lyrics aren’t broken up in weird ways, that they fit on your screens, and double check for any spelling mistakes.
Finally, think through what backgrounds you will use. Try not to use a light background over white lyrics or a motion background that doesn’t fit the mood of the song. Also double check to make sure that your motion background doesn’t have a part that makes your lyrics unreadable - as awesome as your candle background might be, it could make the last line of certain verses unreadable every time it does that cool flickering thing. 
The bottom line is this: the congregation wants to follow where we are leading -  but we need to have at least a general idea of where we’re going first (and where the Spirit is leading us). Mapping out the songs in advance and removing as many distractions as possible will go a long way towards our congregation relaxing, participating, and engaging in worship. 
And one last thing- if you’re reading this post, and you run the lyrics at your church - THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! 

I was at a church recently when I came across this book. It’s called ”Youth Sings” (published in 1951) - and I really loved the “suggestions for using youth sings” that I found on the back page (no sarcasm). A lot of times, we overthink things as worship leaders, and I think this may bring some of us (myself included) back to the basics. I’m going to break down the list over the next few weeks - but I’d love to hear your thoughts too.

Let’s look at point #1

1. We may not use song books anymore - that’s been replaced by propresenter, media shout, easy worship, and the dreaded powerpoint. But if you’re the worship leader - part of your job is to make sure the lyrics are available to your congregation in a format that is easy to read and is without distraction. How many times have you been in a worship gathering and the lyrics have been slow to come up on the screen or they’ve had spelling or grammatical mistakes? Everyone always spins around to give the person operating the computer a nasty look - but ultimately it’s our responsibility.

That responsibility begins with thinking through how I’ll arrange the songs: will I repeat a chorus multiple times? Will I repeat the bridge at the end? How will I transition between songs? After I have these things mapped out - I always take a few minutes to go through the presentation software to make sure the lyrics match the plan. I know we all want to leave room for a spontaneous change in the songs structure - but the Holy Spirit can just as easily tell me when I’m going through the worship set on Thursday that I need to sing the chorus of ‘Mighty To Save’ twice as He can on Sunday morning at 11:15am. I’m not diminishing spontanaety in worship - but if the rest of the song is mapped out, a quick change will be an easy fix for whoever is running my lyrics because I’ve already taken the time to get everything else in order. Not to mention - it’s serving my lyrics operator and ultimately the church when I am prepared.

Some other things to consider with lyrics: make sure that the stanzas, choruses, etc are arranged in a way that makes sense on each slide. Make sure the lyrics aren’t broken up in weird ways, that they fit on your screens, and double check for any spelling mistakes.

Finally, think through what backgrounds you will use. Try not to use a light background over white lyrics or a motion background that doesn’t fit the mood of the song. Also double check to make sure that your motion background doesn’t have a part that makes your lyrics unreadable - as awesome as your candle background might be, it could make the last line of certain verses unreadable every time it does that cool flickering thing. 

The bottom line is this: the congregation wants to follow where we are leading -  but we need to have at least a general idea of where we’re going first (and where the Spirit is leading us). Mapping out the songs in advance and removing as many distractions as possible will go a long way towards our congregation relaxing, participating, and engaging in worship. 

And one last thing- if you’re reading this post, and you run the lyrics at your church - THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! 

31
Jul
Summer Camp season is over for us, but it doesn’t have to be over for you. If you saw us over the summer and you’re experiencing a great deal of remorse over buying those 20 snickers bars instead of a stylish MWB T-Shirt, it’s not too late. For two weeks - we’re offering camp prices and no shipping on all our merchandise. 
Just go here and shop away!

Summer Camp season is over for us, but it doesn’t have to be over for you. If you saw us over the summer and you’re experiencing a great deal of remorse over buying those 20 snickers bars instead of a stylish MWB T-Shirt, it’s not too late. For two weeks - we’re offering camp prices and no shipping on all our merchandise. 

Just go here and shop away!

26
Jul

MWB Lyrics and Chords

I’ve recieved several messages on Facebook about lyrics and chords from the original songs that we did at camp this year. You can download charts for most of our songs here. If you do perform one of our songs live, I’d love to hear your version! Record it and send me a youtube link.

Micah

About

The Micah Watson Band is a full-time worship ministry that exists to connect worship with what God is doing in the nations through music. They desire to see the Church encounter God and sing Scripturally based worship songs. God has gifted the band to lead and write songs that are theologically sound and fun to sing.

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